Book Review: ” The Copper Witch” by Jessica Dall

March 18, 2015 | Posted in Book Reviews, Fiction | By

The Copper Witch (The Broken Line, #1)The Copper Witch by Jessica Dall
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I received a copy of this book from the publisher for free in exchange for an honest review.

When sitting down to begin this review I found myself reminded of the time my husband was participating in a writer’s forum and a new member had posted a short story for critique. Sadly, the story wasn’t very good but my husband wanted to offer some kind of encouragement, so he told the writer that one of the story’s strengths was that it had a beginning, middle, and end. Copper Witch probably isn’t quite that bad – I know several reviewers have given it high marks – but for me, I found myself reading it in more of that “slowing down to look at a car wreck” kind of way then anything. 

The book started off terribly slow, I was fully a quarter into the book before it felt like the plot was actually going somewhere, and much of the writing just felt lazy. There is no world-building to speak of, minimal scene setting, and – aside from Adela’s social climbing – little in the way character development. There really isn’t even any kind of a villain to speak of. Worse, the erstwhile heroine of the story is difficult to like, and once the plot gets underway, it moves so quickly that characters simply drop out of the story and there are almost no consequences for the questionable actions that characters take.
 
When the story begins we meet 15-year-old Adela Tilton, the future baroness of Penrith, and Antony Fletcher, a local painter who has been hired by her grandmother to paint her portrait. After spending most of the day flirting  relentlessly with Antony – pushing all of his buttons, to say nothing of the boundaries of propriety – she decides she would like to learn to paint, and by the next day Antony finds himself installed in the household as her new art tutor. Adela seems to spend more time trying to seduce Antony then she does trying to learn to paint, something her lady’s maid, Lettice, disapproves of highly and keeps trying to thwart – with little success.

Soon, Adela’s grandmother falls ill and Adela in his shipped off to stay with aunt in another town. Coincidentally, her aunt has also invited a Duke and his family – including his son, an Earl in his own right – to stay at the family home for a bit, in the hopes of making a match between her eldest daughter and the Earl. In what is just the first of several iterations of a pattern, the Earl, upon seeing the Adela, becomes instantly enamoured of her and within days is making arrangements so that they can be together. They quickly become engaged, and thus begins Adela’s whirlwind climb to the top of society.

At no time are we ever given a clear explanation for Adela’s constant success in achieving her ambitions, though there are hints that it maybe due to a copper bracelet she wears. She says it was given to her by a fortuneteller who supposedly told her that as long as she wore the bracelet she would get whatever she wants. If that is the case, however, it seems maybe the magic didn’t work as well as it should. Adela certainly does seem to get a great deal of what she wants, but by no means does she get everything she wants and – at times – she gets things that she very much doesn’t want.

The story is filled with a number of twists and turns, but because there’s no villain or force trying to prevent Adela’s success, it never feels like Adela is ever really in any danger. Even the one time she is faced with losing what she’s achieved, there stand yet another enamoured man ready to hand it all right back to her.

“The Copper Witch” is the first book in a trilogy (plus a novella) but even though all we see here is roughly two years from Adela’s life, from what I understand, the other two full novels deal with Adela’s descendants, rather than continuing her own story, though some of that is covered in the novella. This isn’t a series, though, that I plan to follow up on.

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Book Review: “Ignite” by Erica Crouch

February 17, 2015 | Posted in Book Reviews, Fiction, mythology-based, Paranormal Romance, Urban Fantasy | By

Ignite (Ignite, #1)Ignite by Erica Crouch
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I received a copy of this book free in exchange for an honest review

I read the prequel novella – Entice – for this series a couple weeks ago and was blown away – not just by author Erica Crouch’s ability to write stunningly beautiful prose, but also by her ability to weave a new telling of the story of the Fall of Man – including some serious theological concepts – into a paranormal romance that never felt overly heavy or preachy. And even though Entice is technically the second book in the series, it does a great job of setting up the world for the Ignite series, introducing us to the main characters, establishing how this version of the world works, helping us to understand the bond Pen and Azael share – and why she would follow him into Hell, even when she wasn’t sure if that’s where she truly belonged. I wanted to bring this up to encourage you to read Entice before reading Ignite. Even though it was published second, I found that what I had learned from Entice really enhanced the story in Ignite because of how well it set the stage for this truly extraordinary story.

As Ignite opens, we find the Pen and her twin brother, Azael – both demons – finishing up an assignment to collect a soul for Lucifer, when they are shocked to run into a young – and apparently quite new – angel claiming to be the archangel Michael, whose death they had witnessed centuries before during the war between Heaven and Hell.

This new Michael has the silver-feathered wings of an archangel and he carries the archangel sword that belonged to the original Michael – the only archangel sword known to exist. But, as Pen discovers while talking with him, he has no memory whatsoever of his previous life or of the time his soul was held captive and tortured for centuries by his brother, Lucifer. Instead of the arrogant, self-assured Michael of old, who was completely loyal to Heaven and never questioned anything, this new Michael is surprisingly innocent – and even more surprising, he’s asking questions – a lot of questions.

Soon Pen finds herself tasked with either convincing Michael to join the forces of Hell or kill him, while Azael is sent on a mission of his own, and this is where the book
really began to shine. As Pen and Michael interact, the affect each has on the other is profound. We begin to see the vulnerability Pen tries to keep hidden and the strength that this new Michael initially appears to lack.

What I love most about “Ignite”is that it’s an escapist, romantic fantasy that still has the ability to make you think. Pen and Michael are both searching for where they each truly belong. They’ve always been taught that everything is either black or white but are now doubting if that is really how it works.

Their conversations about what – if anything – might lie between those extremes is beautifully handled. Author Crouch provides a lot of good thoughts through Pen and Michael’s dialog while providing room for readers to form their own opinions.

There are many other aspects of the book that I also loved. With one exception, Crouch does a wonderful job of avoiding most of the more annoying cliches of romance books – and even in that case, she doesn’t drag it out overly long. I understand why she did it as it sets our characters up to be where they needed to be for the book’s climax, but I think she could have probably found a more creative way to get to the same place. Her prose continues to be gorgeous. The way she describes locations let me not just see the place in my mind, but to feel the atmosphere, hear the background sounds and sometimes even catch its scent for a moment.

She takes just as much care with her characters. The romance is sweet and the changes Pen and Michael go through as a result of their friendship are well-paced and believable. Likewise, while Azael plays a much more limited role in this book than he does in Entice, the growth he undergoes while working separate from Pen is handled well and helps emphasize just how close the siblings have been.

The book ends on a cliffhanger, which some may find annoying, but in this case, the story has earned the right to leave us hanging for a bit, and I am truly eager to see what’s next for Pen, Azael and Michael.

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