Book Review: “The Dream Thieves” by Maggie Stiefvater

October 5, 2014 | Posted in Book Reviews, Fiction, Urban Fantasy | By

The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2)The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Good, but flawed follow-up to the excellent “The Raven Boys.”

I have absolutely loved the first book in the series “The Raven Boys, so this one had quite a bit to live up to. Unfortunately, it didn’t quite make it. The story is still quite good and held my interest well, and there’s a lot of interesting character development along the way, but there were just a number of things about the book that felt off or out of place, and the author used one technique heavily throughout the book that I’ve always found to be rather annoying.

I think the biggest problem I had overall was that the entire subject this book – the ability to remove things from dreams and bring them into reality – is only connected to the previous book by the very last line of that book, where Ronan reveals that he brought his pet raven out of a dream. This pushes the search for Glendower – the major plot line for the entire series and the motivation for our main characters to have gotten together in the first place – into the background, and a very little progress on that plot is made during this book. Perhaps in the next book a connection between the dream ability and the search for Glendower will be brought into the same circle, but for right now it feels like we just sort of jumped off the track of the original story into a whole new story for reasons that aren’t at all clear.

Also, much of the activity in this book keeps the four Raven boys doing things separately, and features a number of fights between them, which destabilizes the core relationship from the first book – and because the boys are all doing things separately, Blue doesn’t get invited along as much, so her presence is missing from large swaths of the story.

As for the technique that I found annoying, often times when a writer doesn’t want to reveal the identity of a character, they will be introduced and given a kind of “placeholder” name – which is generally based on something descriptive – until the point in the story where revealing their identity will have the greatest impact. I’ve never cared for it much because too often the reveal is letdown and does not carry the dramatic impact that it seems the author intends.

There are two main causes for that kind of a letdown. The first is because the character is described in enough ways through his actions or tidbits about himself that he drops as he speaking to various characters throughout the book that guessing his identity fairly easy. The second comes about because when the character’s identity is finally revealed, he turns out to be someone we’ve never heard of before nor is he connected to any of our characters in any significant way. In both cases, it ends up making the whole subterfuge of hiding his name feel pointless.

On the plus side – and there certainly is one – we do get a considerable amount of good background information on our main characters, and we get to know Persephone, Calla, and Maura much better. There’s a lot of good, tense drama – and, even though the story feels a bit out of place coming out of the first book, it’s an interesting and fun to read story. I certainly enjoyed it enough to want to continue with the series, and am hoping that maybe that next book will help connect some of what happened in the first book to what happened in this one more closely.

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Book Review: The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

September 30, 2014 | Posted in Book Reviews, Fiction, Urban Fantasy | By

The Raven Boys (Raven Cycle, #1)The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Simply excellent

I’d not previously read any of Maggie Stiefvater’s books, but I’d heard good things about her work, and I’d seen that she’d also worked some with Tessa Gratton, who’s books “The Lost Sun” and “The Strange Maid” I’d gladly devoured a couple months ago, so I thought it might be worth a shot to check her work out. I am quite glad I did!

The story is solid paranormal/urban fantasy, even though it doesn’t have any of the standard hallmarks like vampires, werewolves, witches, angels or demons, nor does it have any grand romance at the center to fuel the plot. instead, it offers psychics, ley lines and a long dead Welsh king, along with four very different prep-school boys, several psychics and a psychic’s daughter who amplifies spiritual energy around her and has been told that when she kisses her true love, he will die.

it all adds up to a dark and suspenseful tale of the boys’ obsession with finding the burial place of the king which is rumoured to be somewhere along a local ley line, and what that obsession does to them and those around them.

On the surface, the boys seem like they’d be easy to reduce to a stereotypes: The rich guy, the slacker, the kid from the wrong side of the tracks and the quiet one, but as written by Stiefvater they become so much more, each having multiple layers and surprising depths.

I would recommend this to anyone looking for a change of pace or something a bit darker than much of what I’ve read so far. And now I’m going to dive into the next part in the series!

READER CAUTION: The story deals in places with child abuse and there are a couple of scenes where abuse takes place.

Other books mentioned in review:

The Lost Sun (The United States of Asgard, #1) by Tessa Gratton
The Lost Sun

The Strange Maid (The United States of Asgard, #2) by Tessa Gratton
The Strange Maid

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