Book Review: “Instruments of the Angels” by Monica Leonelle

Instruments of the Angels (Hallows & Nephilim: Waters Dark and Deep #1)Instruments of the Angels by Monica Leonelle
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I received a copy of “Instruments of the Angels” free in exchange for an honest review.

“Instruments of the Angels” is an interesting story with a lot of promise that gets dragged down by some confused pacing and odd characterizations. The plot of the story is good. Monica Leonelle does a good job of creating he world and introducing the reader to it, and her protagonists are – for the most part – distinct and likable, and her villains are suitably dark and ominous.

Two of the biggest issues I had with the book were trying to understand the timeframe during which the story takes place and the believability of the way some characters reacted to changes that come about because of the events of the story. When I talk about the timeframe of the story, I don’t mean this in regards to the era in which the story is set – is quite clearly in the present time – but rather in how much time passes between events and in the story overall. There are some places where it sounds like multiple days have passed during which the story takes place – especially since one character talks about dreams he has which then prompts him to take certain actions the next day – but there are other points where it seems like a considerable amount of the action is supposedly happening over the course of a single day. I found myself having to go back and recheck things I’d already read just to try to keep the timeline somewhat clear. As for the believability of the characters, one of the main characters learns information that’s would typically turn someone’s world upside down, yet she accepts it is true very quickly and without asking a lot of the expected questions one would normally have.

All that said, however, I truly enjoyed the story. It’s a fresh take on the concept of net for them and their involvement in our world and offers a few different threads of ministry – all of which feel vital and provide the characters with an appropriate motivation for their actions. Even though I had issues with this book that led me to have to give it a three-*rating, I’m interested enough in what I read that I’ll wanted to read the next installment, and hopefully some of these issues will have been cleared up by then.

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