February 5, 2017 | Posted in Politics, Trump | By

Wall photo is for illustrative purposes only. This is not the actual wall.

It seems that there are a number of Republicans who aren’t all that eager to spend money on Trump’s wall, and not just because it’ll be expensive and it’s highly unlikely Mexico would ever “repay” us for it.

One big problem is that not many in Texas actually want the wall. For one thing, it’s not clear how useful it would be, and for another, the “squiggliness” of the border presents its own challenges. As Vox notes:

Trying to literally conform a border wall to this fractal terrain would be ridiculous. Any feasible construction project is going to need to be straighter than the actual border, which is going to mean using the federal government’s eminent domain powers to take privately owned land and basically redraw the border. This has been a flashpoint between Trump and elements of the ideological right in the past, since he’s an enthusiastic proponent of using eminent domain to benefit private economic development projects, which many conservatives regard as unconstitutional.

A border wall — unlike a parking garage for an Atlantic City casino — is pretty clearly meant to serve a public function, so the constitutional issue wouldn’t necessarily arise. Nonetheless, it’s generally the case that people don’t like it when the government comes in and takes their land. And it’s easy to imagine they particularly wouldn’t like it if the government came in to take their land so that the president of the United States could avoid admitting that one of his campaign promises was kind of dumb. Moreover, it’s questionable it even would serve its stated purpose . Unauthorized immigration from Mexico has already slowed to a trickle (indeed, by most estimates more people are leaving than arriving), and the un-walled area in particular has almost no border crossings since it’s in the middle of nowhere.

It’s worth noting that the sections of Texas where fences have been built in the past report that it’s inflicted hardship on the area, and when the Texas Tribune surveyed the state’s 38-member congressional delegation it found that none of them wholeheartedly supported the border wall scheme. (Emphasis their’s)

It’s good to see some members of Congress actually listen to their constituents, and that there are some who recognize what an utter folly Trump’s wall plan is.

The article also discusses some of the financial challenges the wall project will face. Since Trump promised that Mexico is going to pay for it, Representatives and Senators from both parties may be able to use that in varying ways to justify not voting to fund the wall or to balk at using deficit spending to do so.

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